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Arrabbiata Sauce
It means angry, furious, and refers, of course, to the wrath of the red pepper flakes

Ingredients:
one 28-ounce can and one 10-ounce can imported peeled Italian plum tomatoes with their liquid
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
salt and black pepper to taste
1/2 to 1 teaspoon crushed hot red pepper flakes1
1/3 cup freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano
1 tablespoon minced fresh oregano leaves

Directions:
1. Stir together the tomatoes with their liquid and olive oil in a medium saucepan, and cook at a low boil, stirring occasionally and breaking up the tomatoes with a wooden spoon, for 35 minutes, or until very thick. Season the mixture with salt and black pepper.
2. Pass the tomato mixture through a food mill into another saucepan, add the red pepper flakes, and simmer for 10 minutes.
3. Toss with pasta. Transfer to a serving bowl and toss with the Parmigiano-Reggiano. Top with minced oregano and serve.

There are spicy-hot, simple tomato sauces made all over Italy, christened with different names -- but arrabbiata is the name for the sauce you're most likely to see in upscale Italian restaurants in America today. It means angry, furious, and refers, of course, to the wrath of the red pepper flakes. (Feel free to add more of them, by the way, if you happen to be feeling unusually angry.) We like this sauce on penne, and on spaghetti too. Lots of restaurants today are using the sauce in non-pasta dishes; angry lobster has become a new staple of Italian-American restaurants (lobster fra diavolo having yielded to lobster all' arrabbiata). Makes enough sauce for 3/4 pound dried pasta