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Puttanesca Sauce
Based on the salacious nature of this sauce's name (puttana means hooker), its origins are usually discussed in some version of the same story

Ingredients:
1/4 cup olive oil
2 tablespoons finely minced garlic
28-ounce can plum tomatoes, drained
1/2 cup pitted gaeta olives, halved
3 tablespoons coarsely chopped anchovies
2 tablespoons capers
1 1/2 teaspoons coarse salt Kosher
1/4 teaspoon hot red pepper flakes
1/4 cup coarsely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Directions:
1. In medium saucepan, heat olive oil over low heat. Add garlic and cook until garlic is light gold, about 10 minutes.
2. Crush tomatoes by hand, leaving juice behind, and add tomatoes to pan. Add olives, anchovies, capers, coarse salt, and red pepper flakes. Simmer gently over moderate heat for 20 minutes, or until the sauce is reduced by about one third.
3. Adjust seasoning and add chopped parsley. Stir to combine.
4. Make sure to mix hot pasta with a little olive oil. Stir in sauce and serve immediately.
Note: Sauce can be made several hours ahead and reheated.

Based on the salacious nature of this sauce's name (puttana means hooker), its origins are usually discussed in some version of the same story. Prostitutes in Naples, the story goes, needed to make something quick and nourishing between...ahem...appointments. Thus was puttanesca sauce born. We have no idea if there's any truth to this. We don't care. No matter who did what to whom, the sauce is a fabulous whiff of Southern Italy -- a chunky, intensely flavored, sun-drenched bowlful of Naples. We like it best on thin, long pasta, like linguine piccole. The original puttanesca has tomatoes in it; there is also a sauce called puttanesca bianca (white puttanesca), which contains olives, capers, and anchovies, but no tomatoes. Makes enough sauce for 1 pound dried pasta