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German-Style Pork Roast
Mouth watering, tender pork roast

Ingredients:
one 8-rib center cut pork roast, rib end (about 6 pounds), chine bone cracked between the ribs
salt and pepper to taste
8 slices bacon
for the gravy
3 cups pork or chicken stock
3 tablespoons butter at room temperature
3 tablespoons flour

Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 275 degrees.
2. Season the pork roast well with salt and pepper. Place it in a roasting pan, fat side up. Drape the bacon slices over the roast so that it is completely covered by the bacon.
3. Place the pork in the oven and roast until the meat reads 140 degrees on a quick-read meat thermometer. If you want the outside of the roast to be especially brown, remove the bacon about 5 minutes before the roast is done, reserving the bacon, and place the roast under a preheated broiler until it's crispy brown.
4. Remove pork from the oven and, if you haven't already done so, remove bacon slices. Place pork on a cutting board, and let it rest for 15 minutes.
5. While the pork is resting, make the gravy: Chop bacon coarsely. Place chopped bacon in the pork roasting pan, and place the pan over high heat on top of the range. Sizzle the bacon until it's very brown. Add the pork or chicken stock, and simmer for 10 minutes. While stock is simmering, mash the butter and flour together in a bowl to make a beurre manié. Just before serving the gravy and while the stock is simmering, add the beurre manié bit by bit, in pea-sized drops. Whisk the pan gravy; it should form a medium-thick sauce. Season to taste and keep warm.
6. When ready to serve, cut the pork roast through the cracked bone into meaty ribs. Serve immediately with gravy.

We've taken several measures here to counteract the lean-pork problem. First of all, we've called for a roast that's cut closer to the somewhat fattier rib end than the loin end. Then, we've added a layer of bacon to this roast for a little extra taste and lubrication. Finally, we've called for a very slow oven -- 275 degrees -- which helps to preserve whatever fat the poor pork has left. It all works out beautifully, and the dish is a great wintertime crowd-pleaser -- especially when served with its bacon gravy and mashed potatoes, and sauerkraut. Serves 8