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Simple Corn on the Cob
There has always been controversy about how to cook corn on the cob

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There has always been controversy about how to cook corn on the cob. Some experts say put the ears in cold water, bring the water to a boil, then turn the heat off (at which point the corn is ready). Others advise you to add the ears to boiling water and cook for 5 to 7 minutes. The modern school recommends a shorter cooking time; some even say that the super sweets need hardly any time at all, and recommend a 30-second dunk in boiling water. We must confess that this tastes raw to us.
We have one strong opinion to add to the literature: Do not remove the husk and silk before boiling the corn. This is heresy- but you'll be amazed at the extra corn flavor the ears pick up when they boil inside their husks. And don't worry about removing the wet silk and husks after cooking; if you let the corn cool a moment or two, silk removal is easier from wet, cooked corn than it is from dry, raw corn.
So here's our preferred method: buy just-picked corn. Get it fast to a very large pot of boiling unsalted water. Throw a few unhusked ears in at a time, so as not to break the boil. Cover if necessary, to bring water back to the boil. Taste for doneness; the corn should take no more than 4 to 5 minutes. Remove from pot, remove husks and silk, and serve immediately with lots of sweet butter and salt. Repeat endlessly.

Corn or maize is a New World food. It's return to Europe created a wave of new recipes. For Americans, corn on the cob is a staple at bar-b-ques and picnics.